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PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

Ponedjeljak, 15.06.2020.

09:00 - 18:30

Registracija

10:00 - 12:30

Predavanja

12:30 - 13:30

Ručak

13:30 - 15:30

Predavanja

15:30 - 16:00

Pauza za kavu

16:00 - 18:30

Predavanja

*potencijalno do 19:00

09:00 - 18:30

Registration

10:00 - 12:30

Lectures

13:30 - 15:30

Lectures

15:30 - 16:00

Coffee break

16:00 - 18:30

Lectures

*potentially until 19:00

12:30 - 13:30

Lunch

Tuesday, June 16, 2020

08:30 - 18:30

Registration

09:00 - 10:30

Lectures

10:30 - 11:00

Coffee break

11:00 - 13:00

Lectures

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch

14:00 - 16:00

Lectures

16:00 - 16:30

Coffee break

16:30 - 18:30

Lectures

*potentially until 19:00

Monday, June 15, 2020

Topics

Divorce and separation and the impact on children

Parental alienation as a traumatic life experience

Parental alienation assessment and differentiation

Object relations theory and parental alienation

Trans-generational transmission of trauma in parental alienation

Power and control and its impact on parental alienation

Attachment trauma and parental alienation

The core problem of induced psychological splitting in a child and its impact in parental alienation

The role of the legal and mental health interlocking partnership in treatment

Towards a new integrative understanding and treatment of parental alienation

Keynote lectures

Prof. Gordana Buljan Flander, PhD, clinical psychologist and psychotherapist, permanent court expert

 

Attachment represents a basic bond established by a child towards his/her caregivers, that ensures survival in literal and emotional sense. As much as attachment could be important, as much as attachment correction could be healing, we are often faced with obstacles in assessment and treatment caused by lack of knowledge or misinterpretations of attachment theory in families. Prof. Buljan Flander, PhD in attachment, will discuss attachment pitfalls in context of parental separation and alienation that affect many experts in the field.

Ass. prof. Milica Pejović Milovančević, MD, PhD, Specialist in Child Psychiatry (Serbia)

 

One of the mechanisms behind alienation is psychological splitting. Splitting typically refers to an immature defense whereby polarized views of the self and the others arise due to intolerable conflicting emotions. A child employing splitting may idealize a parent at one time (seeing the parent as “all good”) and devalue the other parent at another (seeing the other parent as “all bad”). As a defense, splitting allows children to simultaneously maintain contradictory attitudes towards the self and the others, but also prevents them from having a view that integrates both qualities concurrently. This makes life uncertain for the child or the young person and can lead to their feelings of hopelessness, powerlessness, and helplessness, and trauma due to parental separation and divorce can ‘overwhelm their capacity to cope’. In this lecture, psychological splitting will be addressed and explained from psychiatric and psychopathological perspective.

Primarius Domagoj Štimac, MD, PhD, specialist in psychiatry, subspecialist in child and adolescent psychiatry, permanent court expert

 

Child abuse allegations made by one parent on account of another parent can verify as truth, accidentally wrong or deliberately false. In high conflict divorces, especially in alienating attempts, false allegations may be powerful and dangerous tool, manipulating both children and child protection system. How to avoid breaking into toxic triangulation created by an alienating parent and identify false allegations as emotional (sometimes even sexual) child abuse? How to protect children from realistic and not imaginary abuse? How to treat a child convinced of being abused, if the abuse is actually a product of alienating parent's paranoid interpretation or malicious lie? This controversial issue will be discussed from the perspective of clinician, psychiatrist and court expert, prim. Domagoj Štimac .

Traumatic Attachment

Power and Control

Finding an integrated theory of understanding and treating parental alienation

Identification with the Aggressor – An Object Relations Theory of Parental Alienation